Not to worry, she may just be experiencing curiosity…

Not to worry, she may just be experiencing curiosity… Ms Ruth Jans, Mackay Head of House Throughout history, curiosity has not always enjoyed its current status as a valued quality. Although Aristotle attributed it as one of the most important characteristics of humanity, writing that ‘All men by nature desire to know’ (Ross, 2012), throughout the Medieval era, a sense of suspicion prevailed about this concept. It was considered by many that curiosity was a sign of ignorance or of an unhealthy fascination with inappropriate knowledge, and therefore a sin. It wasn’t until the late seventeenth and early eighteenth centuries that philosophers began to view curiosity as ‘associated with acquisitiveness, an insatiable but laudable desire for knowledge’ (Brown, 2006, p143) and therefore elevate it out of sin and back into virtue. ‘Curiosity may be defined as a desire to know, to see, or to experience, that motivates exploratory behavior directed towards the acquisition of new information….and…

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Sport builds character – but is there something missing?

Sport builds character – but is there something missing? Ms Sally Northcroft, Director of Sport It is well documented that competitive sport provides a framework for us to develop our character in a setting where we learn how to co-operate with others, develop resilience and master specific skills. This is not a new notion and in fact was employed by the Ancient Greeks, adopted by British boys’ boarding schools as sport travelled around the globe before settling into American and Australian cultures.  The educational value of sport in any environment is well supported, however opponents to competitive sport also mount a strong argument. The evidence of sport-related cheating, aggression, and self-aggrandisement (to name a few) are outlined by Alfie Kohn in his case against competition. Based on the research, it is clear that by simply competing in sport there is no guarantee that a person will develop into a morally responsible, empathetic, respectful and well-balanced individual.…

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Rediscovering the Ultimate Learning Space

Mr James Seaha, Director of Post-Secondary Planning Where is the ultimate learning space?  Is it the classrooms and laboratories of our schools and universities?  Perhaps it is the libraries, museums and galleries of the world.   If not, then it would certainly be the virtual space accessible in the comfort of our homes, local cafés or in our pockets.  Perhaps it is, in fact, not a space at all and the best learning comes to us from life’s experiences.  The answer to this apparently simple question could be as varied and complex as the learners themselves, or as simple as the concept of an ultimate learning space. On a recent visit to a French museum, I was reacquainted with the ideas of 18th century educator and philosopher, Jean Jacques Rousseau, whose thinking and writing in the fields of arts, education, politics and music helped to usher in French Romanticism and the French Revolution.  I remembered studying his…

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Engineering digital careers for tomorrow’s world in the cloud

Mr Brendon Thomas, Co-Director of Technology Studies Faculty John Seely Brown, co-chair of the Deloitte Center for the Edge, noted in the film titled Digital Media: New Learners of the 21st Century (2011), ‘Probably the most important thing for kids growing up today is the love of embracing change. In a world of rapid change, the need to memorize something is a 20th-Century skill. The need to navigate in a buzz of confusion and to figure out how to trust the information you find, if you can feel confident doing that, the world is yours.’ Technology plays a big part in this buzz of confusion, especially in schooling. Just how much are we investing in our students’ technological readiness for their living, learning and earning futures? (McWilliam, 2012). Over a decade of teaching and parenting has assured me that young people are curious learners; quite happy to navigate this whirlwind of digital confusion. But as they…

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Stand back and be amazed

Dr Ann Farley, Director of Differentiated Studies Faculty As parents and teachers we take great delight in seeing “our girls” constantly perform beyond our expectations. At each assembly we celebrate the achievements of girls who present insightful reports on activities conducted across the country and the world. At so many special events the students prepare, manage, present and perform with mature and sophisticated aplomb. On Friday night as we experience all the fun and excitement of Open Day the student population assumes the responsibility for showcasing the School to their parents and the broader community. The evening plays a significant role in the leadership development of the Year 11 cohort as they consistently rise to the challenge of organising many aspects of the evening. At this time last year, many of the 2012 Year 8 students were being welcomed to the Grammar community. Now they are the “welcomers”, encouraging our Year 8 students of 2013 to…

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